Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

Top Posters

Dual Boot Mac

SGSG Posts: 76
edited January 2007 in General
My mac now dual boots. Now I can learn to program in c++. How exciting!

Just thought I'd share that.

Comments

  • beporterbeporter Posts: 123
    edited January 2007
    [p]My company is moving to a new building, and my boss (the owner) asked us all to come up with wishlists. There are two things on mine so far:
    [p]Ooo! I just went to the Apple Store to copy and paste the URL and it says they're closed, updating the store and such! That usually means new products or bumps!
    Post edited by beporter on
  • SGSG Posts: 76
    Both of those look like a lot of fun. Certainly a lot more fun to spin around in a comfy chair when you don't feel like working than in a crappy chair.
  • terrajiterraji Posts: 69
    mmm... Aeron Chair...

    SG, why do you need windows? get xcode. I have never used it, but I understand it is pretty rad. Also, the g++ compiler is included by default on the command. If you are just starting out, that is where you should begin IMHO.

    Porter,

    3. Dell 2407WFP

    I just got one for my Mac Pro. OS X has never been sexier.
  • beporterbeporter Posts: 123
    The boss has already honored me with two (2!) 2007WFP's! One is powering a crappy old Gateway and the other is the second screen for my trusty 12" G4 PowerBook (which I do al my development on).

    [p]Getting a Mac Pro would solve a bunch of problems for me, allowing me to take remote support calls on the Windows side, and do all my development on the Mac side, without having to switch machines (although Synergy makes that pretty painless right now anyway.

    [p]I can recommend Xcode from experience. I've never used it for command line development (I just use a text editor and write the Makefiles by hand), but it's astounding for GUI development. You can literally have a full (albeit simple) application coded in less than a day. You design your visual presentation using Interface Builder, which lets you drag and drop your buttons, text fields, windows, etc into place, and you hook into them from the code you write in Xcode. The system is amazingly elegant once you learn it. Of course, it's all OO design though, so you'd better be used to writing high level C++ w/ the STL (or something like Java) before venturing into it.
  • SGSG Posts: 76
    I have windows for visual studio. They tell me I need to use that program. Since my programming experience is limited to a year of visual basic about two years ago, I don't think I have the experience to not only use something else, but make it seem like I did it in the program I'm supposed to use. I'll check xcode out for shits and giggles though.

    Besides, windows is already installed. I just use it to run visual studio and an incredibly complicated math program that I don't understand.
  • terrajiterraji Posts: 69
    edited January 2007

    My two 20-inchers for my Linux machine at home are awesome for the sheer wideness. Still, it can't hold a candle to my current setup at school:

    http://www.ece.ualberta.ca/~jarret/mydesk.jpeg

    (Edit: bbcode screws up, and markdown doesn't seem to allow external urls, am I doing something wrong?)

    That's a full 6 foot desk of wideness. Dual-core Pentium machine with Linux hooked up to the two on the left, and my iBook hooked up to the third one. 1600x1200 + 1600x1200 + 1280x1024 + 1024x768 + swivel chair. I am using Synergy, of course. I consider it pretty much the most useful program in existence.

    You should still ask for a 24-incher and a second vid card for the Mac Pro to go in the center. :)

    Oddly, I have never used Visual Studio. Eclipse is the only IDE that I have really spent any serious time in, but still, I would take Vim every time given the choice. Maybe I am biased, but I would say that it is essential to have the skills to program without an IDE to become a proper programmer. Learning on the IDE separates you from the basics of how a computer operates and makes it harder to solve the problems which will inevitably occur down the road. It's kind of like giving a first grader a calculator instead of teaching them how to multiply by hand. Tragically, learning it "the hard way" isn't even really that hard, it's just people get scared within two minutes of seeing a command prompt and give up.

    Post edited by terraji on
  • beporterbeporter Posts: 123
    I'm totally with Terraji on this one. I learned to program using Pascal on 386 DOS machines back in my junior year of high school, and switched to Borland Turbo C++ the year after. College was Assembly, GNU C++, and Scheme (which I think is a crazy language to use for anything other than teaching). I didn't touch an IDE until I did a team-based Visual Basic project in VS my senior year, and an Xcode-based independent study on GUI design and 3D graphics the same year.

    [p] Learning on an IDE is exactly like using a calculator in first grade-- it's throwing the shortcuts at you way before you understand the math underneath. I think learning to program on the command line give you a much more solid foundation to build on later. It's also tons quicker for the majority of small tasks a programmer can solve faster than the average computer user. If I need to perform actions on a huge nested subdirectory of files, and linux command line tools can't cut it, I can whip up a program on the command line a lot faster than it would take somebody to put together just the GUI in Visual Studio.

    [p]Plus, learning in Microsoft based tools is a great way to garantee you'll have to UNlearn a whole bunch of stuff later when you want to start writing portable code. There's hardly anything you can write in VS that you can take elsewhere easily, but it's much more straightforward to write stuff ANYWHERE else and have it be relatively easy to get working on a Microsoft platform.
  • beporterbeporter Posts: 123
    edited February 2007
    The stock installation of Vanilla (this forum software) is awesome in its lack of cruft: I mean, this is software that just gets right down to business, doesn't even think twice about including a single unnecessary "feature" and executes on it incredibly well, but I'm finding the third party extensions to add bbcode support and most of the rest of the niceties people expect from a forum are somewhat lacking in quality.

    [p]Of course, coming from YaBB to this is a pretty big shift.

    [p]Check the URL for this image: External addresses appear to work fine. Tag is [ img ] url [/ img ] same as before. Could it be a permissions thing?

    [p]image
    Post edited by beporter on
  • carriage returns

    image


    are

    screwed

    up
  • terrajiterraji Posts: 69
    edited February 2007

    carriage returns

    [ img ]http://www.ece.ualberta.ca/~jarret/mydesk.jpeg[ /img ]


    are

    screwed

    up
    Post edited by terraji on
  • SGSG Posts: 76
    I should point out that I plan on studying Chem E. and that if I didn't have to program anything, I wouldn't. Unfortunately, I need to take Engineering Computations, which is basically a fancy name to intro to computer programming because you need to have some sort of functional knowledge on the subject.
  • terrajiterraji Posts: 69
    edited February 2007
    you need to have some sort of functional knowledge on the subject.


    Truer words were never spoken.


    besides, programming is fun and profitable :)
    Post edited by terraji on
  • beporterbeporter Posts: 123
    edited February 2007
    The BBcode parser doesn't automatically interpret double-returns as new paragraphs. I haven't had time to look at the code yet. However, putting a [ p ] tag at the start of each paragraph is an easy, if inconvenient, workaround for now.

    [p]Knowing the basics of programming is an awesome skill to have. It give you a much deeper understanding of how computers work, and even if you never write another program directly, it will help you in using computers for the rest of your life.
    Post edited by beporter on
Sign In or Register to comment.